Step 10

Step 10

Get "Buy-In" from Other School Staff
(encourage others to jump on the band wagon)


The school culture, organizations, and social structure can either facilitate or impede adoption of any innovation. Often, informing others about how a coordinated school health program addresses the "whole child" and contributes to a school's mission will garner desired support. If school staff believe that all children can learn and that each child should have opportunities, supports, and services that ensure academic success, they are likely to view a coordinated school health program as complementary rather than as competing for instructional time. If administrators see how this model will help maximize existing funding, time, and human resources, they are likely to view a coordinated school health program as good management rather than an added burden. Existing communication channels and networks, such as faculty meetings, daily announcements, bulletin board flyers, and informal discussions in the teacher's lounge or lunchroom, can help inform others.

  • A coordinated school health program can better address the health-related interests, needs, and concerns of students, their families, and staff, and improve students' academic performance.
  • Improved health status improves school attendance and learning.

Often, people are more receptive to a new concept if it appears doable. Thus, to get "buy-in," a school's health leadership might first determine needs and priorities and then begin finding ways to coordinate and strengthen existing activities without adding staff or space.